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Title 1 Plan

Title I

School-wide Plan

2015-16

School         Micaville Elementary School                                 

 


Schoolwide Title I Plan Overview

 

Schoolwide Title I plans (see Sec. 1114(b) included in the Appendix)

must have the following components:

·        Comprehensive needs assessment

·        School reform strategies

·        Instruction by highly qualified teachers

·        High quality and ongoing professional development

·        Strategies to attract highly qualified teachers to high need schools

·        Including teachers in decisions regarding the use of assessments

·        Strategies to increase parental involvement (Be sure to include your school-level parent involvement policy in your school handbook and your Parent Involvement Plan (which explains how you will spend your Parent Involvement Funds.  Parents must have input into both these as well as your Title I Plan.)

·        Preschool transition strategies

·        Activities for children experiencing difficulty

·        Coordination and integration of Federal, State, and local services


 

Schoolwide Plan

Comprehensive Needs Assessment

2015-16

School Micaville Elementary                            

 

Component A: 

 

A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school (including taking into account the needs of migratory children as defined in section 1309(c) that is based on information which includes the achievement of children in relation to the State academic content standards and the State student academic standards described in section 1111(b)(1). 

 

 

Please identify the documents used for the comprehensive needs assessment.  Data should be gathered from a variety of sources and should examine student, teacher, school, and community strengths and needs.  Findings should be included in this plan.  Items you may want to use include test data including NCEOG and other sources, reading inventories, parent/student/teacher surveys, discipline reports or summaries, progress reports or summaries, retention rates, volunteer hours, attendance rates, school improvement team and committees.  Include what is most helpful for your school and will support your plan for Title I funds. 

 

2015-2016

Title I

School Wide Plan

Comprehensive Needs Assessment

Micaville Elementary School

 

MES – Meaningful~Educational~Strategies

Making~Educational~Stars

 

Vision:  Micaville Elementary School will provide quality instructional in a nurturing environment.  Students will experience hands-on learning and use technology which will prepare them to be future-ready, high-school graduates.  Micaville Elementary School will strive to be a school where students’ academic strengths are fostered, academic needs are addressed, and lives are enriched.  Teachers at Micaville School will use research-based strategies, cooperative learning groups, and a variety of instructional methods to help students become productive members of society.  

 

Beliefs:  Micaville School will:

·        Challenge and encourage all students to learn.

·        Foster a safe and caring environment that promotes life-long learning.

·        Tailor instructional approaches and educational settings to serve a diverse student population.

·        Build strong character in students.

·        Play a vital role in promoting a positive community.

·        Seek, secure, and support an excellent professional staff.

 

Mission:   The faculty and staff at Micaville Elementary will strive to provide a safe and nurturing environment to help all students achieve their full potential as life-long learners and become productive, global citizens.  

 

Core Values:

 

·        Kindness

·        Integrity

·        Dedication

·        Strength

 

Micaville Elementary uses data from formative assessments to make educational decisions for each student’s academic success.  A variety of surveys were administered to the faculty and staff at Micaville School and parents and students at Micaville School.  These surveys include:  NC Governor’s Teachers Working Conditions, NSSE, School Improvement Survey created by Micaville School Improvement Team, individual classroom surveys, and Yancey Technology Survey.  Documentation such as AMTR, STNA 4.0, and NC State Report Card are reviewed and disaggregated to determine greatest need.

Rigby E-Assessment, 3-D assessment – DIBELS, EVAAS, OLWEUS, PBiS, Reading Renaissance program, Reading Eggs, Math Seeds, RAZ KIDZ, Reading A-Z, CPS units, Accelerated Math are all used to determine academic/behavior needs of students at Micaville.  Title I funds are used to purchase these online subscriptions. 

 

Based on data gathered by surveys, assessments, care team discussions, RTI & PEP data, and observations, Micaville School would benefit from creating a schedule to allow ½ Reading Instructor (Reading Specialist) to assist with progress monitoring in reading with K-3 students.  This position will be held by Ms. Michelle Hensley who will devote planning periods and special pull-out times to assist with reading remediation in Grades K-3.  Remediation tutors will be hired using Title I funds to assist with the smaller number of students for remediation.    

 

Title I funds will be used for tutors in targeted K-5 students, on or below grade level, at Micaville School.  One tutor will be designated to assist K-3 students and Ms. Peggy Wheeler will be designated to assist with targeted 3-5 students.  Ms. Wheeler will work 2 days a week in October, November, February, March.  (Tuesday & Thursday).  The K-3 tutor will work 3 days a week – 3 hours a day. 

 

Surveys indicate that Title I funds should be used for remediation funds and technology for our students.

 

Micaville Elementary School utilizes the “Communities in Schools” program.  Reading buddies have been assigned to students who are performing below grade level in K-3 classrooms.  Volunteers offer a variety of services to Micaville School.  Volunteers are used for assist with remediation,

“Big-Brother/Sister” Mentors for PBiS, clerical help, school beautification, and chaperones for events.  Micaville School volunteers logged in well over 1,000 man hours to assist with the instruction and remediation at the school.  All volunteers at Micaville School must complete a background check and be approved by the Central Office prior to the first day of volunteer service.

 

K – 2 Assessments

            Reading            85%                 Math     83%

 

NCEOG Spring - 2015

Grade Three                 Reading            70%                Math   80%

            Grade Four                  Reading            80%                 Math   80%

            Grade Five                   Reading            50%                 Math   70%

 

 

Goal Summaries:

            3rd Grade Reading -  More emphasis should be placed on literary elements. 

3rd Grade Math – Numbers in operation in Base 10. 

            4th Grade – Language and Literature.

            4th Grade – Geometry

            5th Grade – Literature and Informational Text

            5th Grade – Common Core Mathematic and Domains of Algebraic Thinking

 

By AYP categories (ethnicity and other groups) Students identified as Exceptional Children will receive additional remediation services and be offered a slot in the MAGIC afterschool care program at Micaville School. 

 

Based on data, economically disadvantaged students and limited English Proficient students at Micaville are in greatest need of academic intervention.

 

Other types of Assessments:  Formative Assessments – Discovery Education and STAR Reading/Accelerated Math – Students at Micaville made gains from 1st benchmark. Overall, an average of 1.4 years growth.

 

Retention Rate:  1.7%

 

Surveys/interviews/other input – Parent surveys indicate the need for communication planners.  Parents surveys indicate the approval of small class sizes. 

Staff surveys indicate a need for special reading remediation.  Surveys indicate a need for assistance with Progress Monitoring in Reading.  (Reading Specialist/Tutor) will be used to assist with small reading groups and progress monitoring in DIBELS.

 

Discipline Data – PBiS expectations are introduced at the beginning of the school year.  Students are required to follow expectations throughout the hallway, classroom, gym, cafeteria, outside.  Students who do not follow expectations will be referred to the office with a discipline referral form.  Discipline is placed in Schoolnet Database.  Overall, Micaville had 7 office referrals during the 2014-2015 school year.  

Micaville received “Green Ribbon” PBiS School recognition during the 2014-2015 school year. 

Students with behavior issues:  Students who have had multiple discipline referrals will be assigned to a “mentor” and participate in the “Check-in/Check-out” program.  This program is designed to pair a student with an adult role-model, mentor.  The Mentor’s job is to be a support person to this student.  

 

Title I Reward School – 2014-2015 marked the 3rd consecutive school year that Micaville received the Title I Reward School recognition. 

 

EVAAS – All Teachers are recognized as:  Meet Expectations or Exceed Expectations.  The EVAAS reports will be analyzed to determine students who fall just below grade level, as well as students who are below grade level in the subjects of Reading and Math.  These students will be targeted for additional remediation and invited to the MAGIC program.

 

Attendance Rate for the 2014-2015 School Year – 94%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schoolwide Plan

Reform Strategies

2015-16

School              Micaville Elementary School                

 

Component B:

·        Strategies used to assist all children in meeting the State’s proficient and advanced levels of student achievement described in section 1111(b)(1)(D)

·        Scientifically based strategies and methods that

Strengthen the core academic program

Increase the amount and quality of learning time (example: extended school year, before-and-after school and summer programs and opportunities that enrich and accelerate curriculum)

Meet the needs of historically underserved populations

Meet the needs of low-achieving children and those at risk of not meeting the State academic achievement standards

 

·        Methods to determine if needs have been met:

Scientifically based strategies are employed to teach reading and math.  Reading Fundations and Letterland and used in K-2 reading programs. Grades 3-5:  Junior Great Books – Paida Discussions, Novel Studies, Raz Kids, and Interdisciplinary Reading, and Reading A-Z are implemented.   Singapore Math will be used in Grades K-3, along with supplemental materials such as:  Math Journals, Math Seeds, Motivational Math,  Accelerated Math – Online Subscription.  Grades 3-5 will use Math Apps. on the Chromebooks, Math Journals, Math DPI resources, Accelerated Math and/or online subscriptions, and purchased math resources, such as COACH.  ReadWell,

Ortan-Gillingham Reading, Launguage!, Great Leaps! Kahn Academy and Ascend Math are used in the Exceptional Children’s program and ESL program to supplement classroom instruction.

 

·        Title I Funds will be used to purchase “BEE” Book materials for K-2 classrooms.  This is a communication tool for school/home.

 

·        Academic Planners will be purchased for Grades 3-5 using Title I funds.  This is an organizational/communication tool.

 

·        Title I Funds will be used to purchase Resource Academic Supplemental Materials such as:  Ready North Carolina Books from Curriculum Associations – Common Core Math and Reading Supplemental materials.

 

·        On-line subscriptions such as:  Discovery Education, Accelerated Math, Math Seeds, Reading Eggs, etc.  Each student will receive technology opportunities at least 2.5 hours each week.

 

·        Special remediation for students who are not on grade level.  (Title I funds to be used for Remediation Tutor in Reading).

 

·        Students who are not on grade level will be invited to the MAGIC afterschool program where remediation, computer assistance, and help with homework will be offered.

 

·        Micaville School Day – 7:20 am – Doors open – free reading/breakfast. – 2:40 – End of day.

 

·        Students who participate in the MAGIC program may be invited to a Summer Camp for additional reading, math, and interdisciplinary activities will take place.

 

·        Students will be placed in classes with small numbers and no combination classes for the 2015-2016 school year.  They will receive 5 ½ hours instruction each school day.  

 

·        Mini-Ipads will be purchased for K-2 classrooms for instructional use.

 

·        Summer Literacy Program will be available to Micaville Students during the summer of 2015.  Each Wednesday in July, the Media Center will be open for book check-out from 9:00-12:00.

 

·        Teachers will participate in progress monitoring and benchmark assessment to determine if students are on grade-level.  Students who are not on grade level will be remediated and progress monitored more frequently.

 

·        Small group tutoring (during school hours and after school hours)

 

·        Early identification of students with academic need who may qualify for the Exceptional Children’s Program (RTI strategies, MTSS Strategies, Reading Foundations, PRIM strategies)

 

·        ESL students will use the “Great Leaps” program to assist with vocabulary comprehension.

 

·        Explore the Daily 5! Concept to assure students are reading, writing, exploring, each day.  Teachers will visit schools where the Daily 5! has been implemented.  Teachers will participate in a PLC using Daily 5!

 

·        90 Minute K-2 uninterrupted Reading Instruction each morning.

 

·        Kindergarten teachers will have full-time assistants.

 

·        1st & 2nd grade teachers will have help from teacher assistants.

 

·        “Communities in Schools” volunteer program will be used to assist with “Reading Buddies”

 

·        Non-fiction Reading will be promoted more heavily in all grades.  Specifically, reading in the content area of Science will be addressed at grades 4 and 5.  

 

·        Title I funds will be used to fund remediation reading tutors at K-3, 3-5 Grades.

 

How will we determine if this is successful?  Parent surveys, follow curriculum pacing guides and assessments, report cards, benchmark assessment, DIBELS, EOG assessment, State Report Card, and State Grade.

 

 

Schoolwide Plan

Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers

2015-2016

School              Micaville Elementary School                            

 

 

Component C: 

 

All teachers employed at Micaville School are highly qualified.  All professionals and para-professionals are Highly Qualified based on standards prescribed in No Child Left Behind.

 

10 Classroom Teachers are highly qualified. 5 Teachers hold Master’s Degrees. 1 Classroom Teacher is Nationally Board Certified. 

½ Guidance Counselor is Nationally Board Certified and holds a Master’s Degree.

1 Exceptional Education Teacher is Nationally Board Certified and has a Master’s Degree.

½ Media Specialist has a Master’s Degree.  

ESL Specialist serves Micaville School 35% of instructional hours in a week.  She holds a Master’s Degree.

Micaville students would benefit from more service time from ESL instructor.  Micaville students are approximately 60% of her population, yet her service time is stolen in travel.

 

Over the past several years, Title I funds have been used to pay an additional teacher salary to reduce class size at Micaville School.  We also plan to fund a part time reading tutor at K-3 grade level and an additional tutor at 3-5 grade level.

 

Micaville School also benefits from a Speech Pathologist, Differentiated Curriculum Specialist, Occupational Therapist, Physical Education Teacher, Music Teacher, Art Teacher, ESL specialist, behavior specialist, therapist, and a School Counselor who serve identified students.

 

Micaville School participates in the TeleMedicine Program which allows students to visit with the Dr. via videoconferencing.  This program should assist with student absences.  Faculty/staff at Micaville School are also eligible to participate in the Telemedicine Program at the school.  Nurse Yvonne Hardin assists in the coordination of this benefit for our faculty/staff.

 

Our teachers are periodically involved with professional development at state and local levels.  Teachers participate in Professional Learning Communities where data is evaluated to determine the need of the professional development.  Online learning sessions are available via webinars, MOODLES, self-paced modules, and facilitated on-line courses. 

 

The current faculty and staff at Micaville Elementary School are dedicated to the goal of enhancing professional skills through continuous and life-long learning.  As personnel changes arise, we hope to continue to instill these expectations as new faculty members.  Selection of new personnel for this school will be contingent upon the agreement to work towards these improvement goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schoolwide Plan

Highly Qualified and On-going Professional Development

2015-2016

School              Micaville Elementary School                            

 

Component D:

            High quality and on-going professional development* for teachers, principals, and paraprofessionals, including, if appropriate, pupil services personnel, parents, and other staff to enable all children in the school to meet the State’s student academic achievement standards.

 

  1. Describe each of your professional development activities in terms of
    • Meeting the priorities identified in the School Improvement Plan
    • Training, implementing, and follow-up training
    • Evidence of researched effectiveness
    • Evaluation of impact on student learning

 

  1. Describe the method for including the entire school community in professional development planning and activities.

 

The faculty and staff at Micaville Elementary School are dedicated to enhancing their own professional skills through continuous and life-long learning.  Professional Learning is an integral part of the educational process.  Therefore, Professional Learning Communities have been established and are promoted at Micaville Elementary School.  The professional development section of our media center has been enhanced to ensure teachers have access to research-based articles and materials which promote school improvement and academic success in Title I schools.  This year, “The Leader in Me” books have been added to the library to enhance the collection. 

 

A professional development plan in conjunction with school, district, and state-wide school improvement goals will be established and adhered to at Micaville Elementary School.  The plan will include high quality professional development – activities that are sustained, intensive and classroom focused.  The professional development chosen by Micaville Elementary School staff must be research-based strategies.  The Beginning Teacher Program will offer professional development for beginning teachers.  The administrator will attend the Administrators’ Institute offered through WRESA beginning in September and she is currently participating in the Distinguished Leadership Program which will conclude in February.

 

The faculty and staff from Micaville Elementary School will continue to travel to other elementary schools in the required to observe master teachers.  The faculty and staff will seek and observe strategies, activities, and programs effective in meeting AYP goals for all subgroups.

 

Examples of workshops and resources available for use:

 

ESL Instructional Coach

Webinars – self-paced modules, and facilitated on-line courses

Textbook resources and materials

PRIM activities/strategies

English Language Development SCoS plan (WIDA Standards)

Annual ELL testing results and ELL plans

Technology/Computer Programs designed to assist ELL learners

NCCAT

WIKKI Spaces

“Leader in Me” materials and collaboration with other schools

Singapore Math Training (Spring 2015)

Discovery Education Training (Spring 2015)

Junior Great Books – Shared Inquiry

Using EVAAS to Improve Instruction

Reading Fundations

Grade Level Collaboration/Pacing Guides – Math

Promethian/Interactive White Board Training

Chromebooks Training

“The Leader in Me” Professional Learning Community at Micaville School

School Nurse State Conference

Administrators’ Institute at WRESA

Distinguished Leadership in Practice Cohort

SWATT regular meetings

NC-TIES conference

Grade Level Collaboration

Schoolnet Training

Reading/Math Foundations

Statewide EC Conference

 

How does school climate impact attracting and retaining highly qualified teachers?

 

Micaville Elementary Faculty hosts a warm and inviting educational working environment.  Teachers are willing to assist visitors and new teachers. ILT teachers are paired with “buddy teachers” for helpful suggestions and support.  Beginning teachers have a mentor to assist with advice, unanswered questions, etc.

 

The Professional Development attended by faculty/staff of Micaville School will be Scientifically/Researched Based. Elements of the School Improvement Plan will be addressed by the Professional Development.  Impact on student learning will be measured by student engagement, meeting and exceeding benchmarks on Math and Reading, and meeting 5th Grade Science Goals.

 

The current faculty and staff at Micaville Elementary School are dedicated to the goal of enhancing professional skills through continuous and life-long learning.  As personnel changes arise, we hope to continue to install these expectations in new faculty members.  Selections of new personnel for this school will be contingent upon the agreement to work towards these improvement goals.


Support page for High Quality and Ongoing Professional Development – 1

 

Staff Development Activity

Support Data and Identified Need

Evidence of Research

Type of Training/Implementation and Follow-up Training

Evaluation Method

Responsible Staff

Budget

WRESA

Administrators’

Institute

EVAAS

 

 

 

 

After each WRESA session, I will inform the faculty of

pertinent information.

 

Administration

$150.00

(4 sessions for this price).

WRESA

Administrators’

Institute

Instructional

Leadership

 

 

 

“”

 

Administration

“”

WRESA

Administrators’

Institute

Legal Issues

 

 

 

“”

 

Administration

“”

WRESA

Administrators’

Institute

 

Making Change Happen in a Culture of Trust – Part

1 and 2

 

 

 

 

“”

 

Administration

“”

 

Travel – 5 sessions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$250.00

On-line modules

www.rt3nc.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Schoolwide Plan

Highly Qualified Teacher Recruitment Strategies

2015-2016

School                          Micaville Elementary School                                        

 

Component E: 

            Strategies to attract high-quality highly qualified teachers to high-needs schools

 

A.     Describe how your school places highly qualified teachers in areas of need.                                      

All teachers at Micaville School are highly qualified.  Title I funds pay for 1 teacher to reduce classroom size at the K-2 level.  This teaching position is in the K-2 classes to assure younger students receive adequate instruction at an early age.  

Micaville Elementary School seeks highly qualified personnel to fill vacancies.  The supportive staff works in teams to collaborate during planning periods.  A beginning teacher mentor is assigned to year 1 and 2 teachers.  A “Buddy Teacher” is assigned for peer observation and new teacher support throughout the school year.

Together, the faculty, students, and parents of Micaville School have created a warm-caring environment.  Teachers have ownership in the school and practice site-based management with decision making in personnel and budget.

Most importantly, a strong academic reputation and a caring environment are the reasons teachers choose to be at Micaville Elementary School. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B.      How does school climate impact attracting and retaining highly qualified teachers? (Include local supplement; positive environment, etc.)

Yancey County provides a local supplement for teachers.  The small-town closeness and family atmosphere attracts highly qualified teachers to Micaville Elementary School.  This school has a very positive and friendly atmosphere.  Our faculty strives to create a nurturing environment where students are encouraged to express their talents and excel, both intellectually and academically.  Beginning teachers are provided with a mentor teacher.  
Schoolwide Plan

Parent Involvement

2015-2016

School              Micaville Elementary School                                        

 

 

Component F:

            Strategies to increase parental involvement in accordance with section 1118, such as family literary services (See section 1118 in Appendix)

 

  1. School-level Parent Involvement Policy – must be included (document yearly evaluation/changes by parent/school group; review should be in spring)
  2. Parent Involvement Plan - include the plan for spending Parent Involvement Title I funds, jointly decided by school and parents in the spring (See Verification of Consultation page.)
  3. Describe selection process for participants who review policy (school improvement team, advisory council, parent-teacher organization)
  4. Annual Meeting – Include strategies for informing parents of their child’s participation in Title I Part A.  Provide notice of meetings, minutes from meetings, attendance record with positions noted.  Include strategies for LEP parents.
  5. Parental Involvement

How do you involve parents in your program (be sure language is understandable)? 

Describe flexible meeting times, home visits, child care, etc.

How do you provide information to parents - pamphlets, brochures, etc?

Describe parent training and materials to help parents work with their children (literacy training, workshops, family reading nights/activities, adult GED, ESL, etc.)

What opportunities are provided for special population parents?

  1. Include School/Parent/Student Compact and record of parent input and yearly review (should be in spring).  All signed compacts must be maintained at the school.
  2. How are staff educated in the value and impact of parent involvement?
  3. Plan to evaluate parent involvement
  4. Funding – at least 1% of district allocation is set aside for Parent Involvement.

Describe how you plan to use funds for this school year.  Use D above as a guide.

 

In March of 2015, parents voted to continue with the “BEE” Books at Grades K-2 and planners at grades 3-5 for communication. 

 

Parents will participate in, “The Leader in Me” PLC on a monthly basis.  These meetings will take place at 6:00 in the evening to allow more parental involvement. 

 

  1.  Summer Program Strategies

·        Kindergarten Orientation

·        Kindergarten Academy

·        MAGIC – Summer Camp

·        Summer Reading Program – Library has open hours in July.

·        Communication with school during summer hours

  1.  Parental Involvement Strategies

·        Open House early in the school year for each classroom.

·        Home Packets

·        Raz-Kidz – Internet program for school and home

·        Blackboard Connect

·        Technology

·        Open-door policy for parents/staff

·        Bee Books & Planners for Communication

·        Award’s Programs

·        3-D – Parent Letter – (DIBELS)

·        Progress Reports

·        Homebase

·        Parent Night – Fall and Spring

·        Kindergarten Registration/5th Grade Transition Night

·        Meet & Greet opportunities – PTO & School Improvement Team Meetings

·        Personal phone calls/letters

·        School website

Parental involvement will be increased by using parents as volunteers within the classrooms under the direct supervision of MES faculty.  (All volunteers must undergo a background check and be approved by the Yancey County Board of Education).

 

Teachers will provide ongoing communication with parents to involve and inform them of progress, specific educational needs in a particular subject area, and ways they can participate in their child’s education at home.

 

“Celebration of Learning” Award’s Program is held at the end of each grading period.  These ceremonies will be announced in advance.  All parents and family members are invited to attend.  The program provides an opportunity to explain items such as:  changes in curriculum, progress of student, achievements of the school.

 

Micaville Elementary School hosts a variety of events throughout the school year.  These events both welcome and encourage parent cooperation and participation within the school.   The events include, but are not limited to:  Kindergarten Registration, Award’s Day, Talent Showcases, Digital Showcase, ELL Orientation, Kindergarten Orientation, Summer Reading Opportunity Days, PTO meetings, Fall Festival, Literacy Night, Curriculum Connection Meetings, Book Fairs, National Lunch Week, Open House, and Family Math Night.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Schoolwide Plan

Transition

2015-16

School Micaville Elementary School     

 

Component G:

            Plans for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood programs, such as Head Start, Even Start, Early Reading First, or state-run preschool programs to local elementary school programs

 

  1. Describe your transition strategies for creating a smooth transition into kindergarten including how you work with these programs. 

 

Periodically, meetings are held between Head Start personnel/parents and Kindergarten Teachers to discuss transition plans for upcoming kindergarten students.

 

Micaville Elementary School works closely with the community to assure a smooth transition from pre-school to Kindergarten in public school.  Pre-school students and parents are invited to visit the school to become familiar with the surroundings and procedures of the school day.

 

Kindergarten Registration Day is a county-wide transition day held annually.  All upcoming Kindergarten students are invited to the Burnsville Town Center to meet with school personnel.

 

Title I provides funds for a Kindergarten Academy which is held before the first day of school for upcoming kindergarten students.   

 

Kindergarten teachers contact area preschool teachers regarding curriculum and incoming student needs.

 

Kindergarten teachers host, “Kindergarten Academy” prior to the first day of Kindergarten for eligible students. 

 

Teachers/principal conduct school “tours” upon request.

 

Teachers are available to answer questions and address concerns.

 

Open house is held early in the school year to assist with transition.
Schoolwide Plan

Assessment

2015-2016

School        Micaville Elementary School                            

 

Component H:

            Measures to include teachers in the decisions regarding the use of academic assessments described in section 1111(b)(3) in order to provide information on, and to improve, the achievement of individual students and the overall instructional program.

 

  1. Describe how teachers are made knowledgeable of assessment issues, how data are used, and how to analyze data to drive instruction for the school program.

 

Discovery Education programs provide individual student data to assist in curriculum choices for the individual student.

 

DIBELS provides a detailed plan of assessment results for K-3 students.

 

Teachers are provided with NCEOG results which includes goal summary sheets and statistical comparison data for the LEA and State.  Teachers are provided with EVAAS Data.  


Schoolwide Plan

Instructional Activities

2015-2016

School Micaville Elementary School                                        

 

Component I:

            Activities to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering the proficient or advanced levels of academic achievement standards required by section 1111(b)(1) shall be provided with effective, timely, additional assistance which shall include measures to ensure that students’ difficulties are identified on a timely basis and to provide sufficient information on which to base effective assistance.

 

  1. Describe how Title I is conducted at your school. (technology)

Title I funds are used at Micaville Elementary School to fund a teaching position, which allows smaller class sizes throughout the school. 

Title I funds are used to hire remediation tutors at all grade levels to allow remediation in small groups.

Title I funds are used at Micaville School to purchase Chromebooks and mini-IPADs for one-to-one and hands-on technology.

 

All students at Micaville School have access to technology.  Students visit the Computer lab 2-3 times weekly.  Students in grades 3-5 have one-to-one Chromebooks.  Mini-Ipads will be purchased for K-2 use.

 

Diagnostic assessments are performed using Benchmark assessments in Discovery Ed.  Students who are not performing on grade level on DIBELS, Discovery Ed., or NCEOG are required to have a PEP.

 

PRIM or other “personal” educational tactics are employed if a student is not on grade level in Reading and Math.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Describe how your intervention program meets the needs of students.

Individual differentiation educational programs are used by technology, small group instruction, and individual remediation by a tutor hired with Title I funds.


Schoolwide Plan

Coordination/Integration of

Federal, State, and Local Services/Programs

2015-2016

School              Micaville Elementary School                            

 

Component J:

            Coordination and integration of Federal, State, and local services and programs, including programs supported under this Act, violence protection programs, nutrition programs, housing programs, Head Start, adult education, vocational and technical education, and job training.

 

  1. Describe collaborations with other programs.

 

NCSIP

Interns from the High School – Vocational Education Program

Yancey EMS

Community Fire Dept. – Fire Safety program for 4th Graders

Yancey County Schools MAGIC Afterschool Grant

Yancey County Sherriff Dept. – DARE

Yancey County 4-H- Health Education

Telemedicine – Dr. Steve North

NCOHS – Oral Health

Vision Screening

Hearing Screening

Toothbus

Operation Feed-A-Child

Head Start

T. R.A.C. – (storytelling)

Donors Choose

Yancey Foundations – Mini-grants

ELL – Title III

Yancey Literacy Council

PBiS

French Board Electric – Grants

Farm Bureau – Grants

Communities in Schools – Reading Buddies

 

 

 


 

 

 

Signature Pages


SCHOOLWIDE PROJECT SCHOOLS

All activities in schoolwide projects should reflect the statutory requirement that schools particularly address the needs of low-achieving children and those at risk of not meeting the state student academic achievement standards as determined by the comprehensive needs assessment of the school, and that each school address the ten (10) required schoolwide components in accordance with SEC 1114 of NCLB:

 

(b) COMPONENTS OF A SCHOOLWIDE PROGRAM-

(1) IN GENERAL- A schoolwide program shall include the following components:

(A) A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school (including taking into account the needs of migratory children as defined in section 1309(2)) that is based on information which includes the achievement of children in relation to the State academic content standards and the State student academic achievement standards described in section 1111(b)(1).

(B) Schoolwide reform strategies that —

(i) provide opportunities for all children to meet the State's proficient and advanced levels of student academic achievement described in section 1111(b)(1)(D);

(ii) use effective methods and instructional strategies that are based on scientifically based research that —

(I) strengthen the core academic program in the school;

(II) increase the amount and quality of learning time, such as providing an extended school year and before- and after-school and summer programs and opportunities, and help provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum; and

(III) include strategies for meeting the educational needs of historically underserved populations;

(iii)(I) include strategies to address the needs of all children in the school, but particularly the needs of low-achieving children and those at risk of not meeting the State student academic achievement standards who are members of the target population of any program that is included in the schoolwide program, which may include —

(aa) counseling, pupil services, and mentoring services;

(bb) college and career awareness and preparation, such as college and career guidance, personal finance education, and innovative teaching methods, which may include applied learning and team-teaching strategies; and

(cc) the integration of vocational and technical education programs; and

(II) address how the school will determine if such needs have been met; and

(iv) are consistent with, and are designed to implement, the State and local improvement plans, if any.

(C) Instruction by highly qualified teachers.

(D) In accordance with section 1119 and subsection (a)(4), high-quality and ongoing professional development for teachers, principals, and paraprofessionals and, if appropriate, pupil services personnel, parents, and other staff to enable all children in the school to meet the State's student academic achievement standards.

(E) Strategies to attract high-quality highly qualified teachers to high-need schools.

(F) Strategies to increase parental involvement in accordance with section 1118, such as family literary services.

(G) Plans for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood programs, such as Head Start, Even Start, Early Reading First, or a State-run preschool program, to local elementary school programs.

(H) Measures to include teachers in the decisions regarding the use of academic assessments described in section 1111(b)(3) in order to provide information on, and to improve, the achievement of individual students and the overall instructional program.

(I) Activities to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering the proficient or advanced levels of academic achievement standards required by section 1111(b)(1) shall be provided with effective, timely additional assistance which shall include measures to ensure that students' difficulties are identified on a timely basis and to provide sufficient information on which to base effective assistance.

(J) Coordination and integration of Federal, State, and local services and programs, including programs supported under this Act, violence prevention programs, nutrition programs, housing programs, Head Start, adult education, vocational and technical education, and job training.

 

An assurance is hereby provided to the State Education Agency (SEA) that the Local Education Agency (LEA) will assist each participating school in addressing the required ten (10) components of the schoolwide model in accordance with Section 1114 of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB).

School Principal________________________________  Date _________________


PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT 

Section 1118 of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB):

(a) LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY POLICY-

(1) IN GENERAL- A local educational agency may receive funds under this part only if such agency implements programs, activities, and procedures for the involvement of parents in programs assisted under this part consistent with this section. Such programs, activities, and procedures shall be planned and implemented with meaningful consultation with parents of participating children.

(2) WRITTEN POLICY- Each local educational agency that receives funds under this part shall develop jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written parent involvement policy. The policy shall be incorporated into the local educational agency's plan developed under section 1112, establish the agency's expectations for parent involvement, and describe how the agency will —

(A) involve parents in the joint development of the plan under section 1112, and the process of school review and improvement under section 1116;

(B) provide the coordination, technical assistance, and other support necessary to assist participating schools in planning and implementing effective parent involvement activities to improve student academic achievement and school performance;

(C) build the schools' and parents' capacity for strong parental involvement as described in subsection (e);

(D) coordinate and integrate parental involvement strategies under this part with parental involvement strategies under other programs, such as the Head Start program, Reading First program, Early Reading First program, Even Start program, Parents as Teachers program, and Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters, and State-run preschool programs;

(E) conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of the parental involvement policy in improving the academic quality of the schools served under this part, including identifying barriers to greater participation by parents in activities authorized by this section (with particular attention to parents who are economically disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English proficiency, have limited literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority background), and use the findings of such evaluation to design strategies for more effective parental involvement, and to revise, if necessary, the parental involvement policies described in this section; and

(F) involve parents in the activities of the schools served under this part.

(b) SCHOOL PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT POLICY-

(1) IN GENERAL- Each school served under this part shall jointly develop with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written parental involvement policy, agreed on by such parents, that shall describe the means for carrying out the requirements of subsections (c) through (f).

(c) POLICY INVOLVEMENT- Each school served under this part shall —

(1) convene an annual meeting, at a convenient time, to which all parents of participating children shall be invited and encouraged to attend, to inform parents of their school's participation under this part and to explain the requirements of this part, and the right of the parents to be involved;

(2) offer a flexible number of meetings, such as meetings in the morning or evening, and may provide, with funds provided under this part, transportation, child care, or home visits, as such services relate to parental involvement;

(3) involve parents, in an organized, ongoing, and timely way, in the planning, review, and improvement of programs under this part, including the planning, review, and improvement of the school parental involvement policy and the joint development of the schoolwide program plan under section 1114(b)(2), except that if a school has in place a process for involving parents in the joint planning and design of the school's programs, the school may use that process, if such process includes an adequate representation of parents of participating children;

(4) provide parents of participating children —

(A) timely information about programs under this part;

(B) a description and explanation of the curriculum in use at the school, the forms of academic assessment used to measure student progress, and the proficiency levels students are expected to meet; and

(C) if requested by parents, opportunities for regular meetings to formulate suggestions and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the education of their children, and respond to any such suggestions as soon as practicably possible; and

(5) if the schoolwide program plan under section 1114(b)(2) is not satisfactory to the parents of participating children, submit any parent comments on the plan when the school makes the plan available to the local educational agency.

(d) SHARED RESPONSIBILITIES FOR HIGH STUDENT ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT- As a component of the school-level parental involvement policy developed under subsection (b), each school served under this part shall jointly develop with parents for all children served under this part a school-parent compact that outlines how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share the responsibility for improved student academic achievement and the means by which the school and parents will build and develop a partnership to help children achieve the State's high standards. Such compact shall —

(1) describe the school's responsibility to provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive and effective learning environment that enables the children served under this part to meet the State's student academic achievement standards, and the ways in which each parent will be responsible for supporting their children's learning, such as monitoring attendance, homework completion, and television watching; volunteering in their child's classroom; and participating, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the education of their children and positive use of extracurricular time; and

(2) address the importance of communication between teachers and parents on an ongoing basis through, at a minimum —

(A) parent-teacher conferences in elementary schools, at least annually, during which the compact shall be discussed as the compact relates to the individual child's achievement;

(B) frequent reports to parents on their children's progress; and

(C) reasonable access to staff, opportunities to volunteer and participate in their child's class, and observation of classroom activities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(e) BUILDING CAPACITY FOR INVOLVEMENT- To ensure effective involvement of parents and to support a partnership among the school involved, parents, and the community to improve student academic achievement, each school and local educational agency assisted under this part —

(1) shall provide assistance to parents of children served by the school or local educational agency, as appropriate, in understanding such topics as the State's academic content standards and State student academic achievement standards, State and local academic assessments, the requirements of this part, and how to monitor a child's progress and work with educators to improve the achievement of their children;

(2) shall provide materials and training to help parents to work with their children to improve their children's achievement, such as literacy training and using technology, as appropriate, to foster parental involvement;

(3) shall educate teachers, pupil services personnel, principals, and other staff, with the assistance of parents, in the value and utility of contributions of parents, and in how to reach out to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners, implement and coordinate parent programs, and build ties between parents and the school;

(4) shall, to the extent feasible and appropriate, coordinate and integrate parent involvement programs and activities with Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading First, Even Start, the Home Instruction Programs for Preschool Youngsters, the Parents as Teachers Program, and public preschool and other programs, and conduct other activities, such as parent resource centers, that encourage and support parents in more fully participating in the education of their children;

(5) shall ensure that information related to school and parent programs, meetings, and other activities is sent to the parents of participating children in a format and, to the extent practicable, in a language the parents can understand;

(6) may involve parents in the development of training for teachers, principals, and other educators to improve the effectiveness of such training;

(7) may provide necessary literacy training from funds received under this part if the local educational agency has exhausted all other reasonably available sources of funding for such training;

(8) may pay reasonable and necessary expenses associated with local parental involvement activities, including transportation and child care costs, to enable parents to participate in school-related meetings and training sessions;

(9) may train parents to enhance the involvement of other parents;

(10) may arrange school meetings at a variety of times, or conduct in-home conferences between teachers or other educators, who work directly with participating children, with parents who are unable to attend such conferences at school, in order to maximize parental involvement and participation;

(11) may adopt and implement model approaches to improving parental involvement;

(12) may establish a districtwide parent advisory council to provide advice on all matters related to parental involvement in programs supported under this section;

(13) may develop appropriate roles for community-based organizations and businesses in parent involvement activities; and

(14) shall provide such other reasonable support for parental involvement activities under this section as parents may request.

(f) ACCESSIBILITY– In carrying out the parental involvement requirements of this part, local educational agencies and schools, to the extent practicable, shall provide full opportunities for the participation of parents with limited English proficiency, parents with disabilities, and parents of migratory children, including providing information and school reports required under section 1111 in a format and, to the extent practicable, in a language such parents understand.

 

An assurance is hereby provided to the State Education Agency (SEA) that the Local Education Agency (LEA) will ensure that each of the required components referenced above shall be included in the LEA Parent Involvement Policy and the School Parent Involvement Policy for each school served with Title I funding.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                     __________________________________________

                                                                        School Principal                                            Date  

 

 Attestation Statement

 

Starting in 2003, No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) requires you to sign an annual attestation saying whether your school is in compliance with the requirements of NCLB Section 1119, which we’ll explain in more detail below. Attached to this memo is a form of attestation you can complete and send to us for approval.

 

1. WHAT THE ATTESTATION COVERS

NCLB requires that you attest as to your school’s compliance with Section 1119. Section 1119 includes six requirements about teacher and paraprofessional qualifications that apply to your school:

 

u Newly hired teachers. Each core subject teacher hired after the first day of the 2002–03 school year and teaching in a program supported with Title I, Part A funds must be “highly qualified,” as defined in our state.

u Existing teachers. By the end of the 2005–06 school year, all core subject teachers hired on or before the first day of the 2002–03 school year in our district must be highly qualified.

u Newly hired paraprofessionals. Title I paraprofessionals hired after Jan. 8, 2002, must have one of three qualifications:

n Two years of higher education;

n An associate’s degree; or

n A passing score on our state’s paraprofessional assessment.

u Existing paraprofessionals. By Jan. 8, 2006, with only limited exceptions, paraprofessionals hired on or before Jan. 8, 2002, must meet the standards for new paraprofessionals.

u All paraprofessionals. Effective immediately, and again with only limited exceptions, all Title I paraprofessionals—regardless of hire date—must have a high school diploma or a recognized equivalent.

u Paraprofessional duties. Title I paraprofessionals may not perform classroom instruction unless supervised by a qualified teacher and may not perform more noneducational duties (like hall monitoring) than non-Title I paraprofessionals do.

 

If your school is currently in compliance with all six of the requirements, check Box 1 on the attestation. Please do not check Box 1 unless you are certain that you are in compliance with all of the above requirements. If you have any questions about whether your school is in compliance, please call our office. We understand that because the deadline for several of the requirements is in the future, many schools have not yet achieved full compliance. If this is the case for your school, check Box 2 on the attestation.

 

2. OPTION TO INCLUDE ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

You have the option of including additional information on the attestation, describing the qualifications of your teachers and paraprofessionals. You may include this information only
if it is:

n Accurate, with supporting documentation;

n Factual, avoiding opinions or other judgments; and

n Does not identify any individual.

Examples of information that you may add to your attestation include:

n Average number of years of teaching or paraprofessional experience;

n Percentage of teachers with a bachelor’s degree or higher;

n Percentage of staff members with state certification in special areas, such as bilingual education; or

n Descriptions of what your school is doing to help teachers and paraprofessionals get the required credentials, such as offering on-site coursework, aiding in preparation for state assessments, or creating a professional development plan.

If you wish to exercise this option, complete the attestation and return it to us by _______________ [insert date] for our review before signing it.

 

3. DEADLINE

Return a copy of the signed, completed attestation with your Title I Plan.

 

4. AVAILABILITY OF COPIES

NCLB requires that copies of the attestation be kept at both the school and the district’s main office and be available to the public upon request. But there’s no requirement to send copies to parents or to otherwise make it public.

ATTESTATION

I hereby attest that ________________________________[insert school name]

1. q  is                       or                         2. q  is not yet

in compliance with the requirements of Section 1119 of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.

Signature:                                                                                       Date:

________________________________                                                                                               

 


 

Verification of Consultation

 

LEA :

 

 

LEA Code :

 

 

School :

 

 

 

School Code :

 

 

Principal :

 

 

 

School Phone :

 

 

Email :

 

 

 

School FAX :

 

 

 

Street Address :

 

 

 

City/State/ZIP

 

 

 

 

The school currently operates a Title I program under the following model:

 

 

 

 

 

Schoolwide

 

Targeted-Assistance

 

The school will operate a Title I program in the new project under the following model:

 

 

 

 

 

Schoolwide

 

Targeted-Assistance

 

Is the school currently in School Improvement or on the Watch List?

 

 

Yes

 

 

No

 

 

If yes, indicate current status of school

(as below):

 

 

WL

SI1

SI2

CA

R1

R2

Watch List

School Improvement (Choice)

School Improvement (Choice/SES)

Corrective Action

Restructuring Planning

Restructuring Alternate Governance

 

Signatures

 

The undersigned certify that the school Title I program was developed in consultation with teachers, principals, administrators (including administrators of programs described in other parts of this title), and other appropriate school personnel, and with parents of children served under this part, and one of the following:

 

1)       The schoolwide program plan incorporates the ten federally required components as outlined in SEC 1114 of NCLB.

2)       The targeted-assistance program plan incorporates identification procedures to ensure that the program serves children identified as failing or at-risk of failing the State’s academic achievement standards using multiple educationally related objective criteria.  The program is implemented in accordance with SEC 1115 of NCLB.

3)       A written parent involvement policy has been jointly developed, and distributed to, parents of participating children in accordance with SEC 1118 of NCLB.

 

Principal:                                                                                                                                                      Date:                                               

School Improvement Team Chairperson___________________________________ Date: ___________________    

Parent Representative:                                                                                        _______________ Date: ___________________

Title I Program Director:                                                                                      _________Date:  ___________________     


School Prioritized Plan

Based on the annual review of the school needs assessment data encompassing all domains, describe the prioritized plans for the new project year that have the greatest likelihood of ensuring that all groups of students specified in section 1111(b)(2)(C)(v) and enrolled in the school will meet the State's proficient level of achievement on the State’s academic assessments. Describe three to five prioritized program goals that address identified needs.  NOTE:  These program goals should be included in the school’s comprehensive plan for improvement and do not alone constitute a Title I plan.

 

Student Achievement Goals.  Include Targeted Subgroup(s)

Action Step(s)

Assessment(s) and/or Other Measures Used to Determine Outcome

Timeline of Evaluation Including Interim and Final

Professional Development Needed to Support the Action Step(s)

Parental Involvement Needed to Support the Action Step(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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